Tag Archives: Andy Stanley

My Top Two Mentoring Videos

Mentoring is a process that comes with a lot of meat on the bone.  It can be overwhelming to know where to begin and how this mentoring thing works.  Well, these two videos are a great place to start.  One is how to find a mentor, and the other is how to be a mentor…

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6 Steps to Parent Meeting Success

If you haven’t figured it out yet, parents are important to your success in youth ministry or student ministry. And by success, I mean the spiritual growth, depth, and love for the Savior in the teens in your youth group. I say that, because you can grow your youth group by numbers without the aid of parents, whether it is by heavy programming or giving away an iPhone for answering a question in Sunday school.parent_meeting_dribbble-1innh9r

But if you are seeking spiritual depth, if you are seeking a faith in your students that lasts beyond their high school years, if you are seeking a unity and health within your church…you must lock arms with your parents into battle. Teenagers are facing tremendous battles like the negatives of social media (gossip, cyber-bullying, self-centeredness), sexual pressures that happen everywhere from the office chair in front of a computer to taking the next step in a physical relationship, stress for academic achievement, loneliness & abandonment…and the list goes on. Why would you not want another ally in youth ministry? It would be like an Army General being offered 25,000 more troops to help in a war effort and saying, “Nah, I can handle this on my own. I’ve got the training and experience, let me handle it”. It’s ludicrous. But this is happening all across the nation in youth ministries. Stop blaming the youth ministry for the exodus of young people, and take a look at the failure of combining the efforts of youth ministry and parents. That right there is a winning formula for a teenager.

Maybe it will take some more convincing. Maybe you have been burned in the past by parents. Well, even if you confidence needs rebuilding or your skepticism remains, I’d encourage you to give these steps and see how God can use parent meetings to build a healthier youth ministry.

Step #1 – Support Group

Your first goal is to communicate the parent meeting is FOR the parents. It should be obvious that a parent meeting is for…well…parents. But make sure you arrange the meeting to be something the parents enjoy and more importantly, need. Your attendance at parent meetings will always be a struggle, but if it is something that will benefit the parents, they will come.

One specific way is to arrange the room in tables. And following the meeting, explain you’d like the parents to pray for each other. Discuss how each of them are in the same battle, teenage-dom. And you may gain advice and counsel from other parents, but most important can pray for each other. This has been my favorite part of parent meetings. I’ve seen parents talking to each other long after prayer is over, and truly helping each other, life on life. It’s a beautiful thing.

Step #2 – Equip

Come prepared to teach the parents. Sure, the typical youth leader is younger and may not have teenagers of their own, but that doesn’t mean they cannot teach on parenting teenagers. Why? Because there is book that has the authority over all parents, and no one will argue with its content. It’s called the Bible. Other resources: The Seven Checkpoints (Stanley), Raising a Modern Day Joseph (Fowler), Shepherding a Child’s Heart (Tripp).

Step #3 – Youth Culture Update

This is really fun. Come up with a quiz of 10 questions about teen culture. CPYU.org is a great resource for articles and information for these culture quizzes. Plus, when you give away answers, you can give valuable insight on the question. Questions about drugs, social media habits, teens & driving, or academic trends are all good places to start. So much value in keeping your parents clued in on teen culture, and it will give you tremendous credibility, showing you do know things about teenager that parents do not.

Step #4 – Fill the Calendar Later

Many times, we as youth leaders make the mistake of making the parent meeting all about events, programs, and filling the calendar. Sure, there still should be a place for that. But email, calendars, and newsletter can provide that information just as easy. So why waste time in the parent meeting with information about events. Put this information in front of the parents, but talk more about the purpose during these meetings, rather than just dates, times, and permission forms.

world-war-3Step #5 – Prevent World War III

This may be the most important step, so are you listening? DO NOT ask for questions during the meeting. You are inviting disaster. When you open the floor, you are opening it up for criticism, questioning of programs, and you are put on the spot. Rather, make it clear at the end of the meeting you are available to chat afterwards, or the parents can email, text, or call with any questions they may have. This will save you. Trust me on this one.

Step #6 – Food & Childcare

Eliminate the excuses. Provide food and childcare, and you have eliminated 90% of the excuses right there. Plus, everyone likes to eat. So have your leaders help with planning a meal and helping with childcare, and more parents will attend.
Resources: Family-Based Youth Ministry (DeVries), Pushing the Limits (Walker, Calhoun), reThink (Wright)

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Evangelism Events

Continuing our Evangelism blog series, our next stop is evangelism events.  You see, what is the point in training our students in evangelism, if we don’t allow them to use it.  As Andy Stanley says in his book, The Seven Checkpoints, “We waste our time and breath if we tell our teenagers that God has equipped each of them for ministry and then not provide opportunities for them to do just that.”

Listen, the sky is the limit here.  Events range from dodgeball to paintball, shopping to scavenger hunts, and formal dinners to eating contests.  If you are a youth worker reading this, you could probably rattle off 200 evangelistic events off the top of your head.  If not, next week, I’ll provide a list of event ideas for you.

This week is more about the preparation and purposeful evangelism of each event.  You know, there is a time and place to host an event for unity or to get to know students.  But for the most part, events need to have a purpose, and when it is evangelism, be purposeful in your planning.Evangelism

Here are 4 things to implement in your next evangelistic event:

  1. Hunting is not allowed.  Your evangelistic events should not be a hunting experience, where you shoot down visitors with the Gospel, and simply have a count by the end of the day.  NO!  Have a detailed plan of follow-up for these events.  Counselors available immediately after the speaker/gospel are vital to the students first steps in the family of God.  Registration cards for long-term follow-up and discipling are a must.
  2. No age limit.  Who said the speaker and workers had to be adults.  Get your students involved.  Let them be the speaker.  Let them plan the event and the details.  Give them opportunity to use their gifts for the sake of the Gospel!
  3. I need a witness.  Testimonies are powerful.  If you are not a speaker, or your student has trouble coming up with a message…give your story.  Your story of salvation is the second best story ever told.  The first is the Gospel.  Tell them both!
  4. Join the Party.  When someone gives their life to Jesus, join the party in heaven.  Don’t just raise your hands with heads bowed, have them stand up.  Cheer for what happened.  This may not work everywhere, but when someone accepts Christ, celebrate it whenever possible.

 

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Book Review: The Seven Checkpoints

Book Review:  The Seven Checkpoints by Andy Stanley

The Good: 7 checkpoints If you have read any of my book reviews in the past, you know how much I enjoy the personal stories.  There is just something about personal stories that makes points stronger and more practical, in my opinion.  And in this book, there are plenty of these invaluable stories.  Other highlights of this book include the best explanation of the issue of teens and authority that I have every read or heard.  That is just one example how this book was able to provide superior insight in the spiritual life and spiritual needs of teenagers.  Then, in the final chapter, this book puts its money where its mouth is (whatever that means).  What I mean is, basically, the book takes you through the seven checkpoints that are vital principles that every teenager should know.  In the final chapter (and in the appendix) you have are given a game plan in how to implement these principles.

The Bad:  There are just a few things in this book that could be cleared up with a quick edit or backspace button.  Let me give you a few examples.  Rarely are there references next to the Scripture quotes.  Why?  That would just take a few seconds to correct and would be very helpful.  Stanley seems to have a propensity to use hyperbole in his writing.  Example would be on page 121, “The most difficult thing you will do as a teenager is walk away from relationships with people you really care about.”  Lastly, I would highly suggest reading the revised version.  In the 2001 version, there is no reference to texting and social media.  Also, when a celebrity is mentioned, they are outdated.  It needs a little updating.

The Grade:  B+.  This is one that every youth pastor or youth leader should read.  I realize it is written to youth leaders, and I see value in using this in parent meetings, but I guess I expected it to more applicable to parenting than it is.  Other than that, this has great value in youth ministries everywhere.

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3 Tips For Planning Your Student Ministry Teaching Calendar

I have a sickness.  The other day, I received a shipment from Staples and you would have thought it was Christmas.  New pens, new highlighters, and a fresh, blank calendar…pure bliss.  Like a 6 year old in a chocolate fountain.

While I enjoy the process of planning out the teaching calendar, the anticipatory joy of spiritually impactful lessons…it does take more work than just throwing a couple series titles together.  In fact, it is a process that has developed for months.  Let me explain the process in steps.

  1. Feed the Need.  Survey your parents, students, and others to find out what the greatest needs and greatest interest of your students are.  More than likely you will hear topics like purity, end times, devotional life, and the list goes on.  So what I have done is come up with a 6 year calendar, where in the teaching times available, I can show how a 7th grader entering the ministry will learn these things in their 6 years in our student ministry.  (*Could be 4 year calendar if in high school ministry)
  2. Glad That’s Over.  The 4 or 6 year calendar is the heavy lifting of your curriculum planning.  Now the fun part.  Picking your teaching material/curriculum.  See, for me, I don’t choose the same curriculum for all 4 years.  I like to pick and choose, allow myself some flexibility with what I teach from, and what I teach.  I’ve used materials from:  Regular Baptist Press (my personal favorite – fits my teaching style & doctrine well), Youth Specialties, Simply Youth Ministry, Group Publishing, Answers in Genesis, Lifeway, and Zondervan.
  3. Make it Your Own.  Listen to me.  You are not Doug Fields or Andy Stanley, so don’t pretend to be.  Take the curriculum and make it your own, modify and teach it as if it was written just for YOUR students.  Put together you OWN PowerPoint.  Use personal illustration and make up your own introductory hook.  Make your students feel like the lesson is FOR THEM, and not for a church in California or Atlanta.

What about you?  What curriculum do you use?  Got any tips for your teaching planning?

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