Tag Archives: Easter Egg Hunt

5 Tips to Host a Easter Egg Hunt on a Small Budget

Rent a helicopter.  Get the real Easter Bunny to attend.  DC Talk reunion tour concert to open the festivities.  What happens if you don’t have a large budget for your Easter Egg Hunt?  No problem.  There are ways to still host a fun event for your community.

If you are looking for tips on how to host an Easter Egg Hunt – check out my previous posts here and here.

But if you are looking to host an Easter Egg Hunt on a low-budget.  Here’s some tips you need remember:

Get the Church to Help.  As mentioned in previous blog posts, this keeps the budget low when the church donates towards the cause.  Eggs, candy, bottled water…and even cash donations go a long way to keep costs down.  In past egg-fills, we might make a quick run to the dollar store for more eggs or candy, but for the most part we have enough filled eggs for the event.

Egg Return.  Make provisions to have a place where eggs can be returned.  This will save you next year when you ask for more donations.  You will already have a nest egg (pun intended) for your event the following year.

Free.  When you have an event that is free, the expectations are not nearly as high.  When people pay for an event, they desire something in return for their payment.  Keeping it free is not only good practice as a church, but also will allow for a good spirit among those that attend.

Limited but Effective Activities.  Each year we evaluate what activities are worth keeping for the following year.  The majority of our small budget is placed into bounce houses.  These are something every kid loves and are worth the money.  Other activities like crafts, face painting, and prayer table are low-budget activities.

Keep Program Simple.  Each year we make sure to share the Gospel at our event.  It’s not a bait and switch, because it is advertised as people come to the registration table.  But let’s be honest, hundreds of people (especially kids) anxiously waiting for the Easter Egg Hunt are not going to be held at bay for very long.  So the puppet show, video, or speaker should not be much longer than 15 minutes.  That’s all the attention span you got, so use it wisely.

Hope these tips are helpful for your Easter Egg Hunt.  Feel free to comment on how you accomplish your Easter activities. 

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Never Underestimate the Youth of Today…Here’s Why

stop_underestimating_yourself_tyrone_smith1Skepticism is not abnormal.  In fact, it puts you in some pretty hefty company in the Old Testament.  Among the doubters – Abraham, Moses, Joshua, Gideon, King Saul, Isaiah, Ezekiel…and the one that used his age as an excuse, Jeremiah.

Now, I will give it to Jeremiah – he was young.  In Jeremiah, the Hebrew usage of this word child in Jeremiah chapter one referred to boys or youths.  I read several commentaries – and since there is no age given – the estimations range from a young boy to age 21.

There could very well be skepticism in your families, in our schools, and in our churches.  It could be in the mind of children or teenagers.  These ideas could have been put there by other adults that couldn’t see their potential.  Or they may simply have little confidence or are underestimating the special ways God can use them.

Adults often underestimate children and teens as well.  They may excuse their skepticism by saying they are looking out for their feelings or safety.  Underestimating is sometimes a lack of faith or a failure to see the special gifts of the youth of today.  Don’t underestimate what children and teens can do for the kingdom of God.

Parents – we cannot doubt what God can do in our children’s lives and what can be accomplished through them.  Kids & Teens – listening here and online – God can do amazing things in your life…NOW!

Let me give you some examples of what kids can do:

Picture1Alexandra “Alex” Scott was only 4 years old when she opened her front yard lemonade stand to help raise money for children with cancer. A cancer patient herself, Alex has seen her small stand grow from a curbside staple to a national fundraising revolution, boasting supporters, benefits, and events all across the country.  Sadly, she passed away at the age of 8, but her foundation (Alex’s Lemonade Stand) lives on and has raised more than $120 million and funded over 550 research projects towards the goal of putting an end to childhood cancer.

Picture2Shortly after basketball enthusiast Austin Gutwein turned 9, he saw a video that changed his life: a movie about children who had lost their parents to AIDS. Moved to make a change, Gutwein began Hoops of Hope, the world’s largest free-throw marathon, dedicated to raising money for orphaned children from across the globe and providing them with food, shelter, education, and health care. By doing something as simple as shooting free throws, Hoops of Hope participants have raised over $2.5 million.

Picture3It all started when a 9-year-old saw another student on the playground without a coat.  Since then, Maddy Beckmann made it her mission to keep kids warm in her native St. Louis, and her charity, Coat-A-Kid has coated over 10,000 children since its inception.

Why can’t our children and teens do that in our church, our community, and our country…they can and they are!  In our church, this is what has been happening because we have learned to not underestimate our youth:

Over 200 kids came to the Easter Egg Hunt to hear the Gospel & eat loads of candy…and the entire event was planned by teenagers.  Over 40 meals were delivered last October…by teens.  Two Bible studies were formed in the public schools…and were started by a 13-year-old and 15-year-old.  A community garden was planted in the local middle school…by teenagers.  2 years ago 3 teens were serving impoverished kids in Nicaragua  This summer, a team of teenagers are going to witness on the streets of New York.

Sorry Jeremiah, age is NOT an excuse.  God does not want to hear the excuses…He wants obedience.

(If you want to hear the entire message on “The Time is Now” click here)

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6 Tips for a Successful Easter Egg Hunt

Last year, I wrote how to plan an Easter Egg Hunt for the community.  This time, I’d like to follow-up with six quick tips to help you have a successful hunt.  Feel free to comment with ideas you have…Easter_0000_Egg-hunt

Gospel-Driven. I put this first for a reason. I believe these events can be an opportunity for Jesus to be shared. I’m not suggesting a 4 act play on the story of Easter, but a simple object lesson that would be enjoyable for the kids and their parents.

Church Effort. Listen, the idea of a community Easter egg hunt seems pretty overwhelming to do by yourself…so don’t. Allow it to be a church effort. Encourage your church each year to donate the candy and eggs.

Sunny Bunny Eggs. Even though we support this event mostly with donations, I would suggest purchasing a base amount from Sunny Bunny Eggs for two reasons. One, it helps ease your mind that at least you will have some eggs if donations go awry. Second, it is a great organization that supports those with mental disabilities.

Divide the Ages. Too often, I see Easter egg hunts that are not divided by age and the older kids run over the little ones, like Bigfoot over cars at a monster truck rally. Splitting up the ages is always appreciated by the parents.

Bounce House. Book it right now. Book two if you can. Trust me on this one.

Teen Leadership Opportunity. Our student leaders plan and administrate this entire event. You heard me. They recruit volunteers, plan the games, contact the bounce house people, and even give the lesson. Never underestimate what teenagers can do for their community for God’s glory.

 

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Easter Egg Hunt – HOW TO

Easter is a time of year where many are open to the idea of coming to church.  Why not get to know those people in your community that may attend on Sunday, the day before?  How is that done?  One way is by hosting an Easter Egg Hunt on your church campus.  Here is a quick rundown on how to plan and carry out a Community Easter Egg Hunt.  (Special Note: My student leaders planned this whole event.  Maybe this is something your student leaders can do for your church each year.  Expectations rise and potential met!)easter-egg-hunt_t-1

How to Plan

  1. Choose a mission statement – Gospel-centered statement to keep vision/purpose in mind.
  2. Create goals – number of people, number of kids, number of eggs
  3. Separate Planning Team into Two Groups:  Promotion/Publicity, Production & Personnel
  4. Promotion & Publicity – Get the word out – mailings, church announcements, flyers/postcards, radio announcements, website, Facebook event post, church sign;  Donations – Eggs, Candy, Small Prizes;  Sign up list for volunteers – next to display in Lobby
  5. Production & Personnel
  • Make a timeline of tasks that need to be accomplished
  • Reserve items early – Location (if needed), Bounce House, Time slot in church calendar
  • Recruit volunteers – Registration, Game & Egg Hunt Helpers, Security (if needed), Storyteller, Drinks/Food Coordinator
  • Gather Materials – Games materials, Fill Eggs (Sunny Bunny Eggs is a great resource), Tables, chairs, etc.
  • Schedule out the Easter Hunt – From Setup to Tear Down
  • Develop a map – where you want everything, from registration to the actual hunt

How to Host

  1. Meeting – Meet at location early with volunteers for set up (Suggestion:  if possible, do a “mock” setup in the gym prior to the day of Egg Hunt).
  2. Stations, People!  Set up games, bounce house, registration, story telling station, & Egg Hunt area
  3. It’s Show Time.  Meet half hour to hour before – designate volunteers to stations (People started showing up a half hour before ours started, so be aware of this possibility, BE EARLY!)
  4. Registration
  5. Schedule Sample:  Registration/Games/Games shut down/Story Time (Resurrection Eggs)/Egg Hunt/More Games/Final Egg Hunt (With Remaining Eggs)

Meet guests at front location
Give out bags – church information, brochures, tract, Easter service invitation
Bag for Easter Egg Hunt
Mega-Phone or Sound System Set up

How to Follow Up

  1. Gospel – The best thing about our Egg Hunt this year was the Gospel was shared.  It was right before the Egg Hunt, so everyone was willing to hear about Jesus, then we did the Egg Hunt right after.
  2. At Registration – people signed up their child with a phone number.  Possible a registration card would have been more efficient/organized.
  3. Children’s Ministry Team – Follow up with phone calls, visits, and emails.
  4. Pray you see them the next day!
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Who Was the 1st Mentor?

god-touches-adam1 Who was the first mentor in the Bible?  Answer:  God.  Yeah, the Sunday school answer would have won the contest.  It’s true.  If there was ever a mentor that we should model, it would be God.  And the very first discipleship process is found in the Garden of Eden.  So how was God a mentor to Adam, and what did He do in the discipleship process?

1.     Spiritual Guidance – Genesis 2:16-17

It didn’t take long for Adam to receive spiritual guidance from his mentor.  They are pretty clear instructions – don’t eat from this tree.  Let that be a lesson to you in your discipleship process.  Be clear in your spiritual guidance, and help those you are mentoring to not make the common adolescent mistakes.  Impart wisdom and guide their decisions.  Should I go to this party?  Is it OK to date _____?  Help them!

Your job as a mentor is to help that young person make decisions.  Partner with parents and help them on the right path, help them use the Bible as their roadmap, guide them in godly decisions.

2.     Help Solve Problems – Genesis 2:18

God saw it was a problem that Adam was alone, and He fixed it.  He provided a helper for him.  Sure, we are not God, and we cannot solve all the problems of our young generation, no matter how much we would like this to be the case…but we can still help.

Help students find solutions to their problems.  Listen, suicide is the second leading cause of deaths in teenagers.  It is the fourth leading cause of death  in ages 5-15!  We need to help them find solutions, because they are finding the wrong answers all too often. Answers can be found in God’s Word.  Some have parents that will lead them to those right answers, others do not.  Let’s do our part as mentors, and help students solve their problems with God’s Word and prayer.

3.     Give them responsibility – Genesis 2:20

Our motto this year in our student ministry is “Student Takeover”.  My goal is to have students take over multiple ministries.  Sure, it will start small with things like:  announcements and running PowerPoint.  But so far it has evolved into leading prayer groups & small groups, or leading the praise band.  We have even taken it to the point of having the students plan and execute an entire Sunday Night youth group by themselves.  How cool is that!  They are learning ministry.  What’s next in the takeover?  Planning and executing a Community Easter Egg Hunt.  Do I help?  I try not to as much as I can.  You may think that is cruel.  I think it is empowering, teaching, and mentoring!

Keep finding ways to plug students into ministry. Let me give you an example.  There was a 9th grader who was somewhat shy.  So, did I make him be the “announcement guy” or lead a Bible study?  No.  I saw his gifts were in technology and computers.  I talked to his parents and mentioned the idea of getting him plugged into the sound/multimedia team at church and in youth group.  Now he runs PowerPoint for the main service and helps with sound on special events.  How cool is that?  He’s serving!

Sometimes all it takes is recognizing a student’s abilities or gifts, and plugging them in a service opportunity.  God gave Adam the task of naming the animals.  Well, that’s already been done, so find something for the teenager or child you are mentoring to do for God!

Who can you mentor today?

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