Tag Archives: Fathers

Book Review: Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters

Book Review: Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters by Dr. Meg Meeker

The Good:

Eye-Opening. Dads, buckle up. You might want to sit down when you are reading this, especially the first few chapters that make you want to buy a gun, lessen the curfew by a few hours, and but state of the art tracking devices. The statistics and study data is jaw-dropping. My advice: Just take a breather, allow it to soak it, and know that in the coming chapters – help is on the way!strong-fathers-strong-daughters-570x754

Inspirational. The powerful, true stories of fathers taking charge in their daughter’s lives is inspiring. These fathers were truly heroes in their daughters lives, and it inspired the dads reading the pages to be the same to their daughters. The difficult stories are also inspirational in their honesty and the importance a dad is in their daughter’s lives.

Extremely Practical. You will come away with practical ways to be a better dad. I mean, that’s why you read this book in the first place. You opened the book to find ways to be a stronger father and to produce a stronger daughter. The author does a great job at providing practical steps in making this happen.

The Bad:

Can be Repetitive. Can be Repetitive. See what I did there.

8 Chapters later, “Oh There you are God”. Maybe this is my fault. I came expecting much more of a spiritual approach to fatherhood. The emphasis on God’s place in parenting does not come into focus until chapter 8 titled “Teacher Her Who God Is”. Why did she wait so long to teach this important aspect of parenting? The downside of a highly practical book is the spiritual side takes a hit.

Too much Father, Not enough Heavenly Father. Piggybacking on the previous point, there is almost too much emphasis on the father. Sure, the points about the importance of a father in a daughter’s life cannot be stressed enough, but it came at the expense of what the Heavenly Father can do in their life. It might even lead the reader to believe the father must be their #1 resource, which cannot be true. God must be that stronghold and refuge…fathers must come in second, but a distant second to God the Father.

The Grade: B-

Again, this could be my fault, but I expected more spiritual fatherly training. It’s in there, but not as predominant as I expected. However, the practicality of this book is through the roof. I still have recommended it to dads of daughters. It is truly eye-opening, inspirational, and needed training for fathers. You very likely will be motivated to do all you can to protect and be the model for your daughters after reading this book. Your daughter needs you, and you need to read this book.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , ,

Book Review: “What Every Man Wishes His Father Had Told Him” by Byron Yawn

Book Review: What Every Man Wishes His Father Had Told Him by Byron Yawn51pc3yNJ2uL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

The Good:

One Liner After One Liner. Goodness, I have never read a book that had so many one-liners that hit you right between the eyes, especially as a dad. So much so, you had to really take your time through some paragraphs because were so full of sentences dripping with truth and power.

Like a Modern Day Proverbs. The wisdom this book provides for sons and Fathers of sons is priceless. It will provide healing, wisdom, instruction, and parenting guidance. It reminds me of the book Solomon wrote for his son…while it certainly does not have the power of God’s Word, it still draws from Biblical principles for the next generation of men.

Counseling Gold. Countless times I wrote in the margin of this book “counseling illustration” or “use in counseling”. As a young father, I need all the wisdom I can get in parenting my own children, let alone counseling other fathers. This will help.

Humor Like a Desert. Just how I like it. I love dry humor, and this book was full of it. It was well-placed, and allowed the read to be more enjoyable. At times, it kept me coming back for more.

Miscellaneous Reasons for Purchase. #1 – Man Laws. #2 – Chapter on Sexual Purity. #3 – Chapter 18 will grip your heart and will have an incredible effect on the reader (if not, check your pulse).

The Bad:

Redundancy. There was some redundancy of literary style at times. Hard to explain, but sometimes slowed the flow of the read. The repetitiveness in style often cause the writer to say the same thing in different ways in the same paragraph.

Too Dogmatic? I put a question mark here because it wasn’t something that caused me to struggle in my doctrinal view of the book. However, there were some very strong statements that may cause you to slightly raise an eyebrow, but not get bent out of shape.

Take the Gospel, and Call me in the morning. This seems like this is happening more and more in our Christian culture where we simply say the solution is the Gospel. While it probably is true, I need more than just the word, but an explanation. There were times in the book where it had the former without the latter.

The Grade: A

I just finished the book a few days ago, and have already recommended it to a Men’s Bible study group, a parent of a teen, and put it in my planner to recommend at my next big parents meeting. This book comes strongly recommended from one dad to another. With my little boy coming any day now, I needed this, and your son wants you to read this book too.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Which Movie Will You See Valentine’s Day?

There are two completely different movies coming out on Valentine’s Day this year.  One is called “50 Shades of Grey”, and the other is called “Old Fashioned”.  This video helps parents help direct their kids to the right movie.  But it also is a great reminder to dads of the responsibility we have to not only be an example to our daughters, but teach them the type of man they should be seeking in marriage someday.

Check this out:

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

3 Ways to be a Bold Father

Being a father is not easy.  It is a tough task that takes time, patience, energy, love, and a tremendous amount of help from the ultimate example of Fatherhood, our Heavenly Father.  When thinking of a picture of a good father, another word that comes to mind is boldness.  Men, it’s time we be bold fathers.

Here are 3 ways to be a Bold Father (applications from the story of Elijah vs. the Baal Prophets in I Kings 18)

1.  Bold in the Fight Against Evil – “Don’t Compromise”boldness

Don’t compromise to appease the moment. That’s not bold, that taking the easy way out. Stand for righteousness. Even though you know you will get groans when you turn the TV off when the show turns from funny to raunchy. Even though you will get backlash from saying no to purchasing the new video game, because you know what mature rating could mean. Even though you might hear stomping up the stairs when you tell your daughter to go change again because it doesn’t meet the standards of modesty.

Take a stand for godliness, for holiness, for righteousness. Take a stand against evil.

2.  Bold in Witness – “Don’t Baal Them Out”

You can’t “Baal them out”. Listen, there will be times when you know the right answer, you told them how it will end if they continue like this, but they simply disobeyed, ignored, and did it anyways.Don’t “Baal them out”. Suffering the consequences is something that will be their only teacher at times.

We live in a culture that everyone gets a trophy and you can’t grade in red pen anymore because it may damage a 1st graders psyche… our kids, in their disobedience and rebellion need to face consequences…don’t Baal them out.

3.  Bold in Humility – “How can I Serve You?”parenting

Dads, do you serve your family? Before you answer a quick yes – by saying you “work hard everyday to pay the bills and put a roof over your head and this is the thanks I get…” Oops, sorry, that was a speech I was saving for when my kids are teenagers.

Serving your family is more than just going to work everyday, although that is a very good start for a father.I’m talking about, do you serve your family?

Do you sacrifice purchases for yourself to give to your family? Do you give time, even when you have very little to give? Do you find joy in your kid’s joy or do I hear a “you know when I was your age speech a-coming…

Do you give to your kids special times like vacations or daddy dates? Or do you find yourself complaining more about how much this is costing you?

Do you lead in humility? Or as the leader, you just are leading yourself to your happiness?

Do you sacrifice, serve, and lead your family in humility?

 

You see men, being bold is more than being willing to fight a lion. It is being willing to sit down by the little lambs and talk about what is in their heart. Being bold is more than just climbing a mountain with little air supply, it is being willing to work through problems step by step until you reached the peak. Being bold is more than just standing out in the crowd, it is being willing to stand by your wife in good times & bad, stand by your kids when the love you give does not equal the love you receive, and stand by your God when your culture is telling Him to take a seat.

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How to Build a Spiritual Home – Part 2

As discussed last week, there we be no home unless there was a foundation.  So, make sure you are building a firm foundation, rooted in God’s Word before you begin working on the next step.

Once you have your foundation, it’s time to begin framing your house.  And in building a spiritual home, the framing is your Godly example.

framing

Step #2 – Framing – Godly Example 

Proverbs 13:22 – A good man leaves an inheritance to his children’s children, but the sinner’s wealth is laid up for the righteous.

James Dobson says “”Our very survival as a nation will depend on the presence or absence of masculine leadership in the home.”  Do you know the longest running TV comedy of all-time? “The Simpsons” – which portrays a dad that is lazy, unintelligent, overweight, self-centered, and an alcoholic.  The voice of the character says he has to “let his IQ go” when he performs the voice of the dad, Homer Simpson.  Yet, USA Today cited Homer Simpson as one of the “top 25 most influential people of the past 25 years!!  “D’oh!”

In America, we are experiencing an absence of our FathersThe average time father has meaningful dialogue with son each day – 38 seconds.  25% of teens claim they have never had a meaningful conversation with their father.  And 25 million kids grow up in US without a positive male role model in their life.  This has led to the sad statistic of children spending 40% less time with their family than a generation ago.

But this is not new thing.  In the Old Testament, we see the misguided parenting of Eli, and the parenting struggles of Noah, David, and others.  It’s time to set a new cultural trend and it begins in your home.  So, whatever category of parenting you fall into, here is what you need to do:

 Fathers – give your children a spiritual leader that they need.  Strive to be like God the Father.

Mothers – encourage your husband to be that man.  Support him, ask about his devotional life, encourage him to find a mentor, and to find an accountability partner.

Grandparents – Be a support to the fathers.  Mature believers help equip our Fathers.  Help find resources, buy them books or videos, be a Paul to the Timothy’s around you.

 

In case you missed it, here is How to Build a Spiritual Home, Part 1.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Advertisements