Tag Archives: Marriage Counseling

Book Review: Instruments in the Redeemer’s Hands

Book Review:  Instruments in the Redeemer’s Hands by Paul David Tripp

The Good:

Is This Real Life?  What I appreciate about this book is how true to life it is.  These are not utopian principles that only exist on perfect planets.  No, we are talking about chapters full of incredible, insightful and practical advice that belong on the counselor’s shelf.

What does that mean?  Clear definitions of words using Biblical backing.  For example, gossip was defined as when “I confess the sin of another person to someone who is not involved”.  Yep, that’s it.  These tightly wound, easy to pick up definitions are throughout the book, and quite helpful in everyday counseling opportunities.

I’m gonna use that.  You will find yourself saying “oh, I’m gonna use that” out loud on numerous occasions.  The charts, tactics, Bible passages, and unique methods are so valuable to help people who are in need of a change.

The Bad:

Careful there partner.  What I like about Tripp’s books is they are never short on boldness.  It is bold from the very first page where it claims this will be the “best news a human being could ever receive”.  Now that’s bold.  But on occasion, he goes a little too far in his theological statements using language that might be too absolute or take an interpretation too far.  It’s rare, but make sure to not take it all as Gospel (which I don’t believe Tripp intended in the first place).

The Grade:  A-.  I think I am a bit late to the party.  Nearly every counselor training session that I have attended, the speaker recommends this very book.  And it did not disappoint.  Great value in the counselor setting, and for that matter as a pastor, parent and husband…great value in everyday life.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , ,

Book Review: “What Every Man Wishes His Father Had Told Him” by Byron Yawn

Book Review: What Every Man Wishes His Father Had Told Him by Byron Yawn51pc3yNJ2uL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

The Good:

One Liner After One Liner. Goodness, I have never read a book that had so many one-liners that hit you right between the eyes, especially as a dad. So much so, you had to really take your time through some paragraphs because were so full of sentences dripping with truth and power.

Like a Modern Day Proverbs. The wisdom this book provides for sons and Fathers of sons is priceless. It will provide healing, wisdom, instruction, and parenting guidance. It reminds me of the book Solomon wrote for his son…while it certainly does not have the power of God’s Word, it still draws from Biblical principles for the next generation of men.

Counseling Gold. Countless times I wrote in the margin of this book “counseling illustration” or “use in counseling”. As a young father, I need all the wisdom I can get in parenting my own children, let alone counseling other fathers. This will help.

Humor Like a Desert. Just how I like it. I love dry humor, and this book was full of it. It was well-placed, and allowed the read to be more enjoyable. At times, it kept me coming back for more.

Miscellaneous Reasons for Purchase. #1 – Man Laws. #2 – Chapter on Sexual Purity. #3 – Chapter 18 will grip your heart and will have an incredible effect on the reader (if not, check your pulse).

The Bad:

Redundancy. There was some redundancy of literary style at times. Hard to explain, but sometimes slowed the flow of the read. The repetitiveness in style often cause the writer to say the same thing in different ways in the same paragraph.

Too Dogmatic? I put a question mark here because it wasn’t something that caused me to struggle in my doctrinal view of the book. However, there were some very strong statements that may cause you to slightly raise an eyebrow, but not get bent out of shape.

Take the Gospel, and Call me in the morning. This seems like this is happening more and more in our Christian culture where we simply say the solution is the Gospel. While it probably is true, I need more than just the word, but an explanation. There were times in the book where it had the former without the latter.

The Grade: A

I just finished the book a few days ago, and have already recommended it to a Men’s Bible study group, a parent of a teen, and put it in my planner to recommend at my next big parents meeting. This book comes strongly recommended from one dad to another. With my little boy coming any day now, I needed this, and your son wants you to read this book too.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Book Review: “The Complete Husband” by Lou Priolo

Book Review: The Complete Husband by Lou Priolo51DD8823XJL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

Warning: As you read The Complete Husband, you will discover how incomplete you are as a husband. This book is not hazardous to your health, in fact may be quite essential to your spiritual growth as a husband.

The Good:

Counseling Gold. As a young pastor, this book is worth its weight in gold, so to speak. In terms of counseling, it is priceless. There are many “gold nuggets” of truth throughout the book. But the real counseling value is in the practical exercises given extensively.  You may even want to require this for pre-marital counseling.

Easy to Use. This book is not full of lofty, spiritual ideals that cannot never be grasped this side of heaven. On the contrary, Priolo provides practical steps to improve multiple facets of the role of the husband. These steps are clear, although I cannot say they are easy to follow since we, as husbands fail at times.

Brace for Impact. Priolo uses simple points with incredible insight that cause a great impact. The reader will find themselves having many “aha moments”. Insight into the role of the husband is found all throughout the book, providing life-changing behavioral, spiritual, and practical changes.

Homework? Yes Please. The worksheets or homework provided at the end of the chapters and the back of the book are worth the purchase of the book alone. It allows the reader to truly work through the issues on a more personal level.

The Bad:

Nit-Picky. The book is not nit-picky, but I will have to be if I were to find the bad in this book. If I had to pick sometime, it may be there may be some small doctrinal disagreements throughout the book, such as how God’s omniscience relating to “forgetting” the sin of a believer. But again, I’m nit-picking here.

The Grade: A

For lack of better terms, this book will kick your husband butt. The reader, in this case, the husband, will find themselves falling short often to the standard that is set in each chapter. Would you rather read a book about being a husband, and be able to say you have it all figured out? I’d rather read a challenging book to push me to be a better husband to my wife. So if you are ready for a challenge, pick this book up and follow the advice towards being a more complete husband.

Tagged , , , , , ,
Advertisements