Tag Archives: Pastoral Training

Book Review: In Praise of Plodders

Book Review:  In Praise of Plodders by Warren Wiersbe

The Good:

Struck Gold.  This is an absolute gold mine for pastors and ministry workers.  There is so much wisdom in its pages and Wiersbe does not let up from the first pages to the last.

Pastoral Training.  From the Sunday pulpit to the days in between, the reader will be trained to be a good shepherd to his people.  Good reminders, encouragement, and even warnings are given to the reader.  Wiersbe provides insight into ministry that only a grisly veteran could provide.

Whose Line is it Anyway?  I’ve said this before about Wiersbe…he provides the best one-liners that you can just take to the bank.  But, in this book, he relies on pastors of today and yesterday to provide incredible knowledge and teaching to the pastor of old and young.

The Bad:

Repeats Occasionally.  Because these were excerpts from a Christian newsletter, there are occasions where the author repeats information.  But, because the information is so valuable, is it really a bad thing if you read it more than once?

The Grade:  A+.  This was my favorite pastoral ministry book that I have read thus far in my ministry.  Wiersbe has a talent for providing enough push to drive the minister to greater heights, while balancing enough encouragement to push through difficulty and tough sledding.  This book should be on the shelf of every pastor within arm’s length of their desk.  I wouldn’t leave home without it.

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The Pastor’s Book

Book Review:  The Pastor’s Book by R. Kent Hughes

The Good: 

Re-Print!  Maybe the editor missed something.  Instead of “The Pastor’s Book”, would it be more appropriately named “The Pastor’s Textbook”.  The reader will have the experience of sitting in a classroom listening to elder pastors reveal the foundation of pastoral care and leadership.

You Again?  This is a book that will have a place on the shelf within reach.  Would be wise to use a note-card to note all the pages that can be used for various ministries and situations.  For example, you have a wedding coming up?  Well, turn to page 137 to find how to appoint a wedding coordinator.  A few pages later you will find script for a wedding ceremony.  Before all this you can find pre-marital counseling help.  I’m telling you, so many scenarios where this book will give you the full package.

But How Does That Make You Feel?  A guest writer comes in towards the end of the book to discuss pastoral counseling and knocks it out of the park.  You like detail, well this guy talks about how to walk your counselee in the room, position your furniture, and how to be silent.  I’m not being sarcastic, it is incredible practical and dynamite for the pastoral counseling.

The Bad:

Half a Hundo?  Yes, it is expensive.  On sale now on Amazon, but it usually sells for around $50.  This was given to me by a gracious family, and I’m so glad they did.  All that being said, it is worth the price of admission.  Think of it as a seminary level class, and the price does not seem so bad.

The Grade:  A.  Although I’ve been a pastor for about a decade or so, I still know I have much to learn about the pastorate.  Weddings, counseling, funerals, communion, and the list goes on.  No book could review all the scenarios, but this one covers the ins and outs of ministry quite well.  Pastors of all experience levels should have this on their shelf to better shepherd their flock.

If you are looking for a much better review, click here.

 

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Book Review: Am I Called?

Book Review: Am I Called? by Dave Harveyamicalled_header

The Good:

You Talking to Me. What an easy read. Seriously, it is like having a conversation with the author. I’m a big fan of books that are written in a laid-back conversational style. If I read a book about pastoral calling, I would hope it would speak to me. Well, the author’s style does just that – it is like you are being counseled in the chair across from him, and he speaks right to you and your heart.

Dry as a bone. For those that know me, I enjoy dry humor. And this book caused me to laugh out loud at times with the witty jabs that you almost miss, but add life to the book. These little comments and stories provide great flavor to a very meaty subject.

Paging all church search committees. This isn’t just a book for those seeking confirmation of the call, but can be highly useful for pastoral search committees and church boards establishing their philosophy of ministry. What a lesson on the requirements of a pastor, in behavior, practice, and lifestyle. Before writing a job description, you might want to read this book.

The Bad:

Better Sooner than Later. Seriously, this may sound sappy, but the only bad thing about this book is that I did not read it sooner. It satisfied the reader’s longing to understand and confirm the calling. It answers the question “Am I Called” to completion, with great detail, confidence, and sound doctrine.

The Grade: A. Got someone interested in ministry? Put this book in their hands. Think about it. We are talking about the calling to lead the body of Christ…the bride of the Savior of the world. Before any seminary applications, job interviews, internships…read this book. Start here. Seriously, it puts the pastoral call to the test.   Better to test your calling with a hot chocolate, bedroom slippers, and this book…than when you are knee-deep in ministry! Buy the book, and make your calling sure.

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Book Review: Replenish by Lance Witt

Book Review: Replenish by Lance Wittreplenish

The Good:

You need this. As someone in ministry, the introduction wakes you up and sets up the need to read this book. Let me just save you the time from reading the introduction, because I know many of you will skip it anyway, and just know there is reason for every pastor, missionary, or anyone in a ministry…you need to read this book.

Transparency. When an author shows transparency appropriately, it brings the book to life, in my opinion. The author is willing to show his weaknesses and mistakes made in the past to bring a more personal touch and more valuable for the reader.

Short & Sweet. I love short chapters. As a father of many kids, I have like 3 or 4 kids now (kidding, kidding)…but sometimes I get interrupted in my reading and thoughts and momentum of the read can get disjointed. This book provides short chapters that pack a punch. Plus, if these chapters were longer, I honestly think you’d walk away from the chapter like you were just in a heavyweight fight.   Great, challenging content in every chapter.

41 Chapters…There’s One for You. Seriously, if you cannot find one chapter out of the forty-one chapters, you must have reached sainthood or just are too proud to admit your flaws. Everyone in ministry will be able to find something they need improvement. Plus, each chapter provides reflection questions to help you get started on your self-improvement.

The Bad:

Repetitive Beginning. For some reason, the first four chapters seem to repeat the same thought over and over. Not sure why. But, for what it’s worth, it is a very good thought!

Missing Verses. If you’ve read my blogs before, writers should include references when they are quoting the Bible. Do I need to start a petition?

Too Honest? For me, as a reader, I enjoy the honesty of the author. Some readers may be turned off by the honesty and personal stories. This may be less of a bad thing, but more of a toss-up depending on the reader.

The Grade: A. Pastors, buy this. Church people, buy this for your pastor. For someone in ministry, it is a refreshing read. It will save you from years of trouble and burnout down the road, and improve the ministry you are currently serving. This book came strongly recommended from a missionary friend to my pastor, and he liked it so much he bought me a copy. So what does that tell you?

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Book Review: Dangerous Calling

Book Review:  Dangerous Calling by Paul David Trippdangerous_calling_banner

The Good:  Maybe I should have labeled this section of the review “The Great”, because there is some great stuff in here.  The author begins the book with an honest and humble look at his own personal sin struggle with anger and pride.  You can’t help but examine your own life through the author’s guts and transparency.  Throughout the book, you can tell it is written through blood, sweat, & tears of ministry.  Each chapter screams ministry experience and is written out of love for other pastors.  There are must read chapters all over the place.  For example, chapter 3 is a must read for all professors and teachers, from kindergarten to grad level (I actually sent the book and chapter number to my alma mater for their refreshment).  Chapter 4 is a must read for all pastoral search committees, and I mean A MUST!  I can’t remember the last time I was sending a book’s title to specific people to tell them you have to read this chapter.  Incredible ministry insight throughout that provides priceless ministry training to both young and veterans in ministry pure gold.

The Bad:  The only bad would be there is slight repetitiveness towards the end of the book, taking away from the incredible content of the majority of the book.

The Grade:  A.  Given to me at a leadership conference at a ministry balance seminary.  Boy, am I thankful I read it.  This book very well may be the best, and is definitely the most honest, ministry book out there.  In terms of providing valuable insight into longevity in ministry, ministry balance, and burnout prevention…this book was a home run.  Each person in ministry should grab this book.  Notice I didn’t say just pastors, I’m talking anyone in leadership ministry positions, they need to read this.  You hear me, although this is written to pastors primarily (especially in the latter chapters), there are ministry principles in this book that ministry leaders need for their spiritual health.

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