Tag Archives: Student Discipleship

Need a Book for Mentoring Junior High Boys?

Book Review:  A Young Man’s Guide to Making Right Choices

The Good:

Yep, That Sounds Right.  The book gives you an inside look at the life of a teenage boy.  And as I went through this with one of my students, we both found it to be right on in many ways.  The struggles and decisions were dead on.  The author chose the right subjects to discuss at just the right time.  So, as a result, the conversation flowed naturally from chapter to chapter.

Junior High Gold Mine.  You just don’t find many books like this.  Turning a teenager is not an easy task on anyone.  These boys to men need some help.  And with this book, help is on the way!  It provides easy to read chapters, loads of follow-up questions, and challenging material to help these young men grow to be men of God.

The Bad:

Updating…With any book, it could use some updating.  Technology is going at such a rapid pace, there are some words and vernacular that is somewhat dated.  Even with this book being published only 7 years ago, you may have to add to some of the application to keep it relevant.  But for the most part, the practical suggestions are very applicable and up to date.

The Grade:  A.  It’s not earth shattering or rocket science, but I will say this…It is one of the best resources I have ever come across in mentoring junior high boys.  There is not a ton of material out there, and this is an age that needs discipleship and guidance.  So parents, youth pastors and workers, I would encourage you to meet with a handful of guys and read through this book together.  Spend some time teaching them these important principles.  You may save them from making poor decisions, and help them make godly choices.

 

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Evangelism Events

Continuing our Evangelism blog series, our next stop is evangelism events.  You see, what is the point in training our students in evangelism, if we don’t allow them to use it.  As Andy Stanley says in his book, The Seven Checkpoints, “We waste our time and breath if we tell our teenagers that God has equipped each of them for ministry and then not provide opportunities for them to do just that.”

Listen, the sky is the limit here.  Events range from dodgeball to paintball, shopping to scavenger hunts, and formal dinners to eating contests.  If you are a youth worker reading this, you could probably rattle off 200 evangelistic events off the top of your head.  If not, next week, I’ll provide a list of event ideas for you.

This week is more about the preparation and purposeful evangelism of each event.  You know, there is a time and place to host an event for unity or to get to know students.  But for the most part, events need to have a purpose, and when it is evangelism, be purposeful in your planning.Evangelism

Here are 4 things to implement in your next evangelistic event:

  1. Hunting is not allowed.  Your evangelistic events should not be a hunting experience, where you shoot down visitors with the Gospel, and simply have a count by the end of the day.  NO!  Have a detailed plan of follow-up for these events.  Counselors available immediately after the speaker/gospel are vital to the students first steps in the family of God.  Registration cards for long-term follow-up and discipling are a must.
  2. No age limit.  Who said the speaker and workers had to be adults.  Get your students involved.  Let them be the speaker.  Let them plan the event and the details.  Give them opportunity to use their gifts for the sake of the Gospel!
  3. I need a witness.  Testimonies are powerful.  If you are not a speaker, or your student has trouble coming up with a message…give your story.  Your story of salvation is the second best story ever told.  The first is the Gospel.  Tell them both!
  4. Join the Party.  When someone gives their life to Jesus, join the party in heaven.  Don’t just raise your hands with heads bowed, have them stand up.  Cheer for what happened.  This may not work everywhere, but when someone accepts Christ, celebrate it whenever possible.

 

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Book Review: Disciplines of a Godly Young Man

Disciplines of a Godly Young Man – By Hughes & Hughes

The Good

If the purpose of the book is to lead a young person through the disciplines of the Christian life, and use this book for the purpose of discipleship…then this book hit the ball out of the park.  There is another version for adult discipleship (found heredailydisciplines), but for mentoring or discipleship of young men, this ranks at the top of my list.

Not only does it provide a great tool in discipleship, it also is challenging for the reader as well.  It provided Biblical and practical methods for achieving the disciplines of the Christian life.  It leaves very few stones unturned and is not afraid to challenge the reader to reach for greater heights in their spiritual walk.

If you are a teacher, preacher, parent, or mentor…this book is loaded with illustrations that drive the importance of daily disciplines.  I was constantly underlining the stories and illustrations.  If anything, that is worth the price of admission.

The Bad

There were some demonstrative and wide-sweeping statements that were made a few times.  Although, for the most part I agreed, it was a little dangerous.  For example, words like “never” and “no way” come often and with great weight.  I would take note of this in discipleship, and talk over these absolute statements together.  You may find they need to be stated this strongly to drive home the importance.

The Grade:  A.

You heard me.  I give it the highest grade besides perfection.  For discipleship, there are few better.  If you are a youth worker, parent, mentor, teacher, aunt, uncle, grandparent (do I need to keep going) of a young person, buy it and use it to disciple.  Many chapters can be used for young women as well.

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Discipleship – 4 Keys to Student Discipleship

What are we discipling our students into?  My answer is found in Colossians 1:23…that type of faith!  Discipleship is developing a faith that sticks, a faith that is their own, a faith that is their foundation, a faith that is boldly shared with others…a faith that is at the heart of a true follower of Jesus Christ.

Here’s the thing, and I think you probably realized this, was that there is no 10-step process or whatever to producing true disciples.  However, I do think there are 4 key concepts in discipleship of young believers.

Discipleship requires:

  1. Knowledge – Proverbs is clear that we need knowledge before we can capture wisdom.  Therefore, there needs to be Doctrinal/Biblical/Theological training, which can happen in small group, Sunday School, and youth group arenas.
  2. Relationships – There needs to be mentoring outside the context of the family.  This is something that must happen, and is most commonly found in the small group structure.  Chap Clark in his research for the book “Hurt” claims that each student needs 5 positive adult relationships to influence a young person spiritually.  That is where youth leaders/sponsors can take their place…we are not asked to take the place of the parent…but I do believe we have value in being that assistant coach that helps the parent in producing Christ-followers.
  3. Connection – Do not neglect the importance of inter-generational ministry.  While I do believe youth ministry needs to do a better job at allowing the family to be the voice and equipping the parents, but there is no need to abandon youth ministry all together (see movie “Divided” to find out more about this movement).  However, I do think there is great value in integrating the students in the church:  worship, children’s ministry, mission trips, older generation connection, etc.  If there is a connection, a feeling that they can be used, and an understanding of how they can use their gifts in the church – then I feel they are more likely to stay.  Say it with me…Connection!
  4. TIME  – This is maybe something that we all miss.  We’ve all heard the expression of how you spell LOVE is T-I-M-E.  And although it is very corny, it is true.  Very rarely do our students remember our lessons, but they do remember the time we spend with them both in church and outside church…that informal and formal time that I was talking about.

 

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